Free Prostate Cancer Screening at Weill Cornell on September 19th

6th Annual Free Prostate Cancer Screening

When: Wednesday, September 19th
7:00 am to 5:00 pm
Where: New York-Presbyterian Hospital
525 East 68th Street (at York Avenue)
Payson Pavilion 2nd floor, Room F260
  • No appointment necessary for men over 40
  • Screening involves a PSA blood test and a prostate (DRE) exam
  • This is a screening test and is not for men already diagnosed with prostate cancer

For more information, please call (212) 746-5450

 

NYP/Weill Cornell Campus Map

Click on the campus map on the left to enlarge and view the location of the Payson Pavilion.

Cornell Researchers Discuss Device to Collect Living Prostate Tumor Cells: Video

On June 12, 2012, Cornell researchers David Nanus, Brian Kirby and Paraskevi Giannakakou discussed their new microfluidic device that collects circulating, living prostate cancer tumor cells from blood.

The research, conducted collaboratively between Cornell University and Weill Cornell Medical College, aims toward tailoring cancer treatment and improving patient survival. Click below to view the presentation.

USPSTF Panel Announces Final Recommendation Against PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer

The  U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), a government panel, has issued a recommendation that men should not get routinely screened for prostate cancer using the PSA test. The panel found there is little evidence that testing for PSA, or prostate-specific antigen, saves men’s lives, and that it causes too much unnecessary harm from the treatment of tumors that would never have killed them. The panel concluded that the benefit of screening was outweighed by the potential risks, which include pain, fever, bleeding, infection and problems urinating, resulting from biopsies as well as incontinence and impotence associated with the treatment of tumors that would not have otherwise caused harm. Click here to read more about this on the Prostate Cancer Foundation website, including a dissenting opinion and comments from the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

The American Urological Association, one of the most significant professional associations for urologists, oncologists, and radiation oncologists focusing on prostate cancer has provided helpful information, primarily aimed at primary care physicians.

The USPSTF recommendations in no way affects men who have already been diagnosed with prostate cancer and have received or are currently receiving treatment.  PSA remains one of the important tools to follow the results of treatment.  We suggest that you discuss your PSA results with your physician.