Doing Better on Behalf of Bladder Cancer Patients

Scott Tagawa_IMG_5903On Monday, April 18th, Dr. Scott Tagawa presented promising bladder cancer clinical trial results at the 2016 AACR Annual Meeting.

This phase II study of the antibody-drug conjugate (IMMU-132), demonstrated positive results in a group of adults with metastatic urothelial cancer who did not respond to standard chemotherapies or relapsed after receiving several rounds of the standard chemotherapy treatment regimens.

A form of immunotherapy, antibody drug conjugates are a targeted therapy that leverages the capability of monoclonal antibodies to attach to specific targets on cancer cells. By attaching a drug to the monoclonal antibodies, treatments are able to “hitch a ride” into the cancer cells.

“In this study, eighty-four percent of patients were alive at the nearly one-year mark, compared with an average overall survival of 4-9 months in similar patients who received chemotherapy regimens,” says Dr. Tagawa.

Some side effects were reported, including neutropenia, a low count of a type of white blood cells (neutrophils) in the blood and some diarrhea, but less than would be expected with the free form of the parent drug irinotecan. Irinotecan is a chemotherapy drug mostly used for the treatment of colon cancer. In the body, it is metabolized and breaks down into SN38, which is a more potent molecule. Because of its potency, it would be too toxic to deliver SN38 into the body in general.

IMMU-132 is a drug in which SN38 is linked to an antibody which recognizes Trop2. Trop2 is a protein in the surface of several different types of cells and is over-expressed on many common cancer types, including urothelial cancer. Since the drug shuttles SN38 preferentially into tumors, patients benefit from the potent drug without as many side effects as general chemotherapy.

This drug is also known as Sacituzumab Govitecan, and has already received FDA-breakthrough designation for the treatment of patients with triple negative breast cancer.

The Weill Cornell Medicine clinical trial continues to enroll patients with advanced urothelial cancers (tumors arising from the bladder, renal pelvis, and ureters). For more information about eligibility and enrollment, click here.

“Moonshots” and More: How We’re Developing Personal Cancer “Cures” through Precision Medicine

In President Barack Obama’s final State of the Union address, he emphasized the “moonshot” need to cure cancer. At Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, we are actively working towards that goal.

420_Dr. David Nanus with patient Irene Price 8 x 12
Irene Price and Dr. David Nanus, Chief, Hematology and Medical Oncology at Weill Cornell Medicine

Through our use of gene sequencing and precision medicine, we are transforming the way cancer is characterized and treated. Using a multidisciplinary approach and the EXaCT-1 test, here at the Weill Cornell Genitourinary (GU) Oncology Program, we are able to sequence the genes of advanced stage cancer patients. We can then narrowly tailor personalized treatment regimens based on the genetic makeup of a patient’s tumor which indicates whether a cancer is likely to respond to a particular treatment therapy.

Irene Price came to Dr. David Nanus, Chief of the Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, with metastatic bladder cancer, and had more than 20,000 genes sequenced with the EXaCT-1 test. Dr. Nanus and his colleagues determined that the reason she wasn’t responding to prior treatment rested in a specific genetic mutation within her tumor. As a result, the team was able to prescribe a personalized treatment regimen – one more often used in the treatment of breast cancer.

The results were life changing. It caused her cancer to completely disappear. According to Price, “I’ve had college graduations that I wouldn’t have had, weddings that I wouldn’t have had, and the birth of great grandchildren that I wouldn’t have had.”

Learn more about our personalized approach to cancer care in a two-part series on NY1:

Part 1: “Gene Sequencing Effort Helps Pinpoint Cancer Treatments”

Part 2: “Tailored Cancer Treatments Fit Doctors’ New Approach”


To make an appointment with one of our clinicians, please call 646-962-2072.