Movember 2017 is Here!

For nearly 10 years, we have been proud to participate in a month-long campaign to raise awareness and funds for men’s health each November, also known as Movember.

The campaign dates back to 2003 when two friends in Australia tried to bring back the moustache trend by growing out moustaches (or “mo’s” as they are commonly called in Australia) during the month of November. The following year, after realizing that this facial hair served as a conversation-starter, they decided to channel that energy to raise money for prostate cancer research.

Awareness (and mustaches) have grown over the years, and in 2007, Movember officially launched a global campaign to change the face of men’s health – literally and figuratively through increased awareness and funds. Another way people can get involved is by “moving” and setting a walking, running, biking or swimming goal and working to achieve it every day throughout Movember. Today, over 5 million people from more than 20 countries have collectively raised over $700 million dollars. The Movember Foundation uses this money to fund research around the world to reduce the number of men dying from prostate and testicular cancer, as well as mental health issues. Movember is committed to funding research that will reduce the number of deaths from prostate and testicular cancer by 50% by 2030.

Screen Shot 2017-10-31 at 5.47.04 PM
From L to R: Dr. Scott Tagawa, last year’s Movember Captain, Dr. Daniel Margolis, this year’s Movember captain

We’ve been proud Movember partners for nearly 10 years now and have benefitted from many Movember research grants to further our cancer research, most recently being named one of six teams to receive a 2017 Challenge Award from the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) and the Movember Foundation to investigate new, cutting-edge treatments for metastatic prostate cancer.

This 2017 Movember-PCF Challenge Grant has funded our latest research developing new treatments for treatment-resistant advanced prostate cancer. More details on the grant and research it supports can be found here.
In past years, Movember-funded grants have supported our research in the following areas:

  • Blood tests that assess the tumor’s circulating DNA to predict reasons for treatment resistance.
  • Circulating tumor cell (CTC) tests to predict which patients are more or less likely to respond to hormonal therapy or chemotherapy.
  • Assessing the genome of initial tumors in the prostate compared to advanced, treatment resistant tumors.
  • Evaluating inflammation in adipose (fat) tissue around the prostate, which is associated with tumor growth.

Throughout the month of November, staff and physicians at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian will be growing mustaches, exercising and raising funds for the Movember Foundation in support of our shared mission to cure cancer.

Get Involved!

  • Join our team by visiting https://moteam.co/wild-weill-cornell-mos
  • Grow a moustache and commit to going razor-free. It’s a great conversation starter to encourage friends and family members to donate to Movember.
  • Spin for a cure! Kill two birds with one stone. Get your workout in and support the Wild Weill Cornell Mos. Attend our cycling events on November 16th and 18th, with proceeds benefiting our team’s Movember fundraising goal.
  • Shave the date and celebrate the end of Movember by attending a happy hour. Stay tuned for final details including date and location.

Last year, we raised $13,000. We want to top that this year by raising $20K or more. Help us get there and remember that every dollar counts in the quest to cure cancer!

 

 

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